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Tuesday, April 14, 2020 | History

3 edition of introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects found in the catalog.

introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects

Margaret C. Sharpe

introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects

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  • 34 Currently reading

Published by Armidale College of Advanced Education] in [Armidale, NSW .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bandjalang language -- Dialects.,
  • Yugumbir dialect.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Margaret C. Sharpe ; with chapters by Marjorie Oakes, Terry Crowley, Jill Fraser-Knowles.
    SeriesOccasional paper, Occasional paper (Armidale College of Advanced Education)
    ContributionsSharpe, Margaret C.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPL7101.B3 S43 1996
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 169 p. :
    Number of Pages169
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL409515M
    ISBN 100646275747
    LC Control Number98110917
    OCLC/WorldCa38192819

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introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects by Margaret C. Sharpe Download PDF EPUB FB2

ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: "Revised edition of An introduction to the Bundjalung language and its dialects, by Margaret C. Sharpe and others.". attached is a PDF of a guide about the Yugambeh-Bundjalung people and their dialects in surrounding areas.

I particularly like chapter 5 (page ) which include native stories and songs. however the book also works as a traditional educational tool for learning language, it has a chapter for word adaptions, vowels, consonants, clauses. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects.

[Armidale, N.S.W.]: M. Sharpe. MLA Citation. Sharpe, Margaret C. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects / Margaret C. Sharpe ; with chapters by Marjorie Oakes, Terry Crowley, Jill Fraser-Knowles M. Sharpe [Armidale, N.S.W.] Sharpe, Margaret. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects.

Armidale: the Author; Sharpe, Margaret. Grammar and texts of the Yugambeh-Bundjalung dialect chain in Eastern Australia. München: Lincom Europa. Wafer, Jim, and Amanda Lissarrague. Yugambeh–Bundjalung, also known as Bandjalangic is a branch of the Pama–Nyungan language family, that is spoken in northeastern New South Wales and South-East Queensland.

Yugambeh–Bundjalung was historically a dialect continuum consisting of a number of varieties, including Yugambeh, Nganduwal, Minjangbal, Njangbal, Biriin, Baryulgil, Waalubal, Dinggabal, Ethnicity: Bundjalung people, Western.

Yugambeh (or Mibanah, from Mibanah gulgun, literally "Language of men" or "Sound of eagles) also known as Tweed-Albert Bandjalang, is an Australian Aboriginal language spoken by the Yugambeh living in South-East Queensland between and within the Logan River basin and the Tweed River basin, bounded to the east by the Pacific Ocean (including South Stradbroke Language family:.

Grammar and texts of the Yugambeh-Bundjalung dialect chain in Eastern Australia / Margareth C. Sharpe; Aboriginal pathways in southeast Queensland and the Richmond River / J.G.

Steele; An introduction to the Bundjalung language and its dialects / by Margaret C. Sharpe and others.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

Publishing History This is a chart to show the publishing history of editions of works about this subject.

Along the X axis is time, and on the y axis is the count of editions published. Sharpe, Margaret. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects. Revised (3rd) edition with chapters by Marjorie Oaks, Terry Crowley and Jill Fraser-Knowles.

Armidale, NSW: University of New England. Sharpe, Margaret. Sharpe coined the name Yugambeh - Bundjalung as a cover term for a group of dialects from nort - east New South Wales and south - east Queensland () and produced a dictionary (on CDROM) of Yugambeh - Bundjalung in attached is a PDF of a guide about the Yugambeh-Bundjalung people and their dialects in surrounding areas.

I particularly like chapter 5 (page ) which include native stories and songs. however the book also works as a traditional educational tool for learning language, it has a chapter for word adaptions, vowels, consonants, clauses.

All Yugambeh – Bundjalung Dictionary with grammar, texts etc. All files in Word unless otherwise stated. Contains: Phonology and grammar; Complete dictionary-all dialects;Texts; Coastal Bundjalung; Western Bundjalung; Yugambeh and neighbouring dialects; Baygalnah Jagun; An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects (PDF).

Muurrbay plans to conduct workshops around Bundjalung-Yugambeh country to help people use this online dictionary. It is a work in progress so your feedback is important to us. Please read the instructions by following the "more" button below. If you are not logged in you will not have the sound recordings.

Middle Clarence. wubin +. A few Bundjalung dialects have been recorded in some detail, while for others there are limited records, or no record at all.

A large collection of audio recordings of Bundjalung speakers, and researchers’ field notes are held at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies in Canberra. Outline of the language: People. In 4 libraries. 1 CD-ROM: Microsoft Word file ; 12 cm.

Yugambeh language -- Dictionaries -- English. Bandjalang language -- Dictionaries -- English. English language -- Dictionaries -- Yugambeh language.

English language -- Dictionaries -- Bandjalang language. Yugambeh-Bundjalung dialects -- Australia. Aboriginal Australians -- Languages -- Dictionaries. Allora' s Past. The Early History of the Allora District, Darling Downs, (). An Introduction to the Yugambeh -Bundjalung Language and its Dialects.

Ancient Aboriginal Stories: a Window on the Past. Australian Geographic April-June. ().Author: David Parsons. Gurgun Mibinyah (belonging to Mibiny speakers) is a dictionary of the northern varieties of the language Yugambeh-Bundjalung, or Bandjalangic, spoken from the Tweed River area of the northeast corner of New South Wales to the Logan River area in the Gold Coast area of southern Queensland.

Other dialects of this language exist down to the Clarence River, and west to. Bundjalung Language Facts: Bundjalung, or Yugambeh-Bundjalung, is an Australian Indigenous language of the northeastern New South Wales and South-East Queensland coast. "Bundjalung" is used as a cover term for the dialect chain as well as to refer to certain individual dialects.

The term Bundjalung is used as a generic for a number of related dialects. Termed Bundjalung proper, but also refers to one of these dialects, spoken around Coraki (cf.

Crowley and Sharpe ). Sharpe () includes Yugambeh in this group of dialects, and opts for the cover term Yugambeh-Bundjalung. It is a blessing that some dialects have been recorded and in written form where we can access it still now and teach ourselves and our children these wonderful words of our local country and its people.

In many of these words the n sounds more like a gn together. Byron Bay was originally called means Meeting Place. Yugambeh–Bundjalung, also known as Bandjalangic is a branch of the Pama–Nyungan language family, that is spoken in northeastern New South Wales and South-East Queensland.

Khwarshi is a Northeast Caucasian language spoken in the Tsumadinsky- Kizilyurtovsky- and Khasavyurtovsky districts of Dagestan by the Khwarshi people. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects (Occasional paper) '' Margaret Ward, John Folkard: Sundials Australia: The Homoeopathy Colouring Book '' A life of its own: A social and economic history of the city of Geraldton and the shire of Greenough, Dictionary of the Gubbi-Gubbi and Butchulla language.

Spring Hill: Aboriginal University of Australia. Blake, B. "Australian Aboriginal Languages: A general introduction". St Lucia: University of Queensland Press. Sharpe, M. An introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics.

Sharpe, M. iction: United States Department of Agriculture. Message 1: Grammar and Texts of the Yugambeh-Bundjalung Dialect Chain in Eastern Australia: Sharpe Date: Sep From: Ulrich Lueders Subject: Grammar and Texts of the Yugambeh-Bundjalung Dialect Chain in Eastern Australia: Sharpe Title: Grammar and Texts of the Yugambeh-Bundjalung Dialect Chain in.

Margaret has worked on the many dialects of Bundjalung language and was keen to help people learn more language, she has recently published an updated dictionary – grammar in electronic format.

Some non-Aborignal people attended, as well as Bundjalung people from Lismore, Grafton and Cabbage Tree Island. Other dialects of this language exist down to the Clarence River, and west to Allora and Warwick. All varieties of the language, including the Mibinyah varieties, have dropped out of regular use in the area.

However, there are rich written records dating from the nineteenth century into the first half of the twentieth century.

A Gutnbaynggir Language Dictionary, Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Cooperative, Steve Morelli (comp.)Aboriginal Studies Press for AIATSIS, Can berra. ISBN 0 8,pp. This is an attractively produced and solidly bound book which incorporates all materi als which have been compiled on the Gumbaynggir language.

A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Despite the textbook format, this book is the most extensive description of any Apachean language form (excluding Navajo) yet published, and goes a long way toward providing a substantial reference.

Though it may not fully satisfy any of its intended subaudiences, this work is a major contribution to Athabaskan linguistics that will be of great. To make the case for the linguistic status of PISL, Davis examines its structure at the level of phonology, morphology, and syntax employing the concepts of sign language linguistics that have Author: Frantisek Lichtenberk.

The narrative of Requiem for a Beast could be set in a number of locations within Australia, but the Aboriginal language used in teh recording is from the Bundjalung Nation, whose country incorporates the north-east corner of New South Wales.

The Bundjalung language is closely related to its southern neighbour, Gumbaynggirr, and to the Yugambeh. This "open O" occurs in all 7-vowel and 9-vowel systems and in a fairly large number of 5-vowel systems. Its place in English is dialectally varied, but in R-retaining dialects it is generally the variant of [o] before [ɹ].

In R-drop dialects, "or" generally becomes a long [o], usually written [o:] [ʌ] - open-mid/low-mid unrounded vowel. Introduction. Silverstein's seminal () paper identified a person/animacy hierarchy whereby nominals higher on the hierarchy (e.g. 1st and 2nd person pronouns) are more likely to be marked with accusative case, whereas those lower in the hierarchy (e.g.

inanimates) are more likely to be marked with ergative case. Silverstein's hierarchy () is reproduced in 1, and Cited by: Australian languages generally lack a part of speech with typical determiner features such as obligatory use, competition for a specific position in the noun phrase and specialization in this function.

This study uses a sample of languages to. Yugambeh–Bundjalung languages (2, words) exact match in snippet view article find links to article aspect (used in other varieties for most instances that use the English future tense) has shifted in the Tweed-Albert Language to an irrealis mode, now denoting.

The tiger very often fought rolling on its back and held the lion in its grip until it defeated him."[] Favoring the lion Clyde Beatty, the animal trainer and performer who owned several tigers, lions, hyenas, and other exotic animals, believed that in nine out of 10 times, "a full-grown lion would whip a full-grown tiger".[54].

Young Linguists’ Insights, an edited collection, offers a fresh perspective on a number of current issues in interdisciplinary linguistics. Both renowned specialists and junior researchers.

Introduction - There's crime out there, but not as we know it: Rural criminology - the last frontier A revised view of the verbal suffixes of Yugambeh-Bundjalung Schalley, A.

and Kuhn, S. A corpus-based analysis of German (sich) 'erinnern' Creoles and minority dialects in education: An update Goddard, C.W. and Wierzbicka. An Introduction to the Yugambeh-Bundjalung language and its dialects, by Margaret C.

Sharpe, and others. Rev. Armidale, University of New England, ISBN Revised edition of An Introduction to the Bundjalung language and its dialects. eh Language.

lung Nation – Languages. inals – Languages. Yugambeh (many other names; see below) is an Australian aboriginal language spoken by the Yugambeh Bundjalung people living on the South-East Queensland coast between the Logan River and the Tweed River (including South Stradbroke Island).

[2]Yugambeh is one of some dozen or two dozen dialects of the Bandjalang the differences in Yugambeh .Introduction General information Latgalian is a regional language spoken in the Eastern part of Latvia in Central Europe, the region called Latgalia (Latgola in Latgalian, Latgale in Latvian; both forms are also found in publications in English).1 B01 Margaret Sharpe Sharpe, Margaret Margaret Sharpe 06 03 CBDX 02 Gurgun Mibinyah (belonging to Mibiny speakers) is a dictionary of the northern varieties of the language Yugambeh-Bundjalung, or Bandjalangic, spoken from the Tweed River area of the northeast corner of New South Wales to the Logan River area in the Gold Coast area of southern .