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Thursday, April 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat found in the catalog.

Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat

Wendell C. Johnson

Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat

a precision study in the Texas Panhandle

by Wendell C. Johnson

  • 261 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Agricultural Research, Southern Region, Science and Education Administration, U.S.D.A. in New Orleans .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Winter wheat -- Yields -- Texas -- Texas Panhandle.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Wendell C. Johnson and Ronald G. Davis.
    SeriesAgricultural research results -- 5.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 43 p. :
    Number of Pages43
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18214705M

      The decrease in yields is more noticeable with durum wheat. Statistics Canada said production across the Prairies is expected to be . Other articles where Winter wheat is discussed: agricultural technology: Dryland farming: inches ( millimetres) per year, winter wheat is the most favoured crop, although spring wheat is planted in some areas where severe winter killing may occur. (Grain sorghum is another crop grown in these areas.) Where some summer rainfall occurs, dry beans are an important . Significant progress already has been made in the development of winter hulless barley lines. To date, we have developed more than 1, hulless winter barley populations. In , we will evaluate over hulless populations and pure lines in yield tests and select pure lines among nea headrows.


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Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat by Wendell C. Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat: a precision study in the Texas Panhandle. Stone and Schlegel () summarized yield-water supply relationships for grain sorghum and winter wheat for studies conducted from to.

Grain yield was related to available soil water at emergence (ASW e) (increased kg ha −1 cm −1 in sorghum and 98 kg ha −1 cm −1 in wheat). Grain yield was also related to in‐season precipitation (ISP) (increased kg ha −1 cm −1 in sorghum and 83 kg ha −1 cm −1 in wheat).

Thus, if water is a yield-limiting factor, increased soil water under monoculture NT winter wheat production should allow for yield increases in dryer years or areas of lower annual precipitation when compared with CT winter wheat on any of the four planting by: Water scarcity threatens the sustainability of irrigated agriculture in semi-arid regions, and ridge-furrow planting systems (RFPS) can be a prospective rainwater harvesting approach.

In this study, we aimed to develop a promising water-saving strategy to boost maize productivity and water use efficiency (WUE). Inwe carried out a field experiment to study the effects of Author: Zhaoquan He, Tonghui Zhang, Xinping Liu, Xue Shang.

With increasing water shortage resources and extravagant nitrogen application, there is an urgent need to optimize irrigation regimes and nitrogen management for winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the North China Plain (NCP).A 4-year field experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of three irrigation levels (W1, irrigation once at jointing stage; W2, irrigation once at Cited by: 7.

However, water shortages have constrained agricultural sustainable development in the NCP, as winter wheat consumes 60–80 % of groundwater, resulting in sharp declines in groundwater resources. Thus, water resource conservation is crucial for the sustainability of agricultural development in this region, and improved water use efficiency (WUE) of wheat is a promising strategy to alleviate water stress Author: Zheng-Rong Kan, Qiu-Yue Liu, Cong He, Zhen-Huan Jing, Ahmad Latif Virk, Jian-Ying Qi, Xin Zhao, Hai.

Evaporation from the soil within a winter wheat crop during the acuively growing period in the spring, was estimated to be 15 and 37% of Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat book for and respectively.

In the central Great Plains, winter wheat is dominant and requires about 9 months to mature so the fallow period is about 15 months. A common cropping system in the central and southern Great Plains is to sequentially grow winter wheat with grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), corn (Zea mays), or other summer crops.

This provides two crops every 3 years with about 11 months of fallow between crops to store water. Aaron, YHWH’S High Priest, and the children of Israel were eyewitnesses as to how Leviticus should be interpreted Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat book they obviously counted 50 days AFTER the seventh Sabbath complete because when Aaron declared the feast/Chag to YHWH, it was in the fourth month at the time of the summer wheat harvest, NOT the winter wheat that is.

In the NCP, rainfall is usually concentrated in the maize growing season (June to September) after winter wheat is harvested. Therefore, it is possible that the soil water used by wheat plants can be replaced by summer rainfall, and greater SWU by wheat plants may, therefore, ensure a better use of summer by: Grain yield was related to available soil water at emergence (ASW e) (increased kg ha −1 cm −1 in sorghum and 98 kg ha −1 cm −1 in wheat).

Grain yield was also related to in-season precipitation (ISP) (increased kg ha −1 cm −1 in sorghum and 83 kg ha −1 cm −1 in wheat).

Johanson, W. C., and Davis, R. (), ‘Yield–water relationships of summer fallowed winter wheat’, Agricultural Research Results, Southern Series (USDA) 5, ARR-S Google Scholar Lee, H.

(), ‘Soil conservation in China's Loess Plateau’, Journal of Soil and Water Conservation, pp – Cited by: 7. Winter wheat seasonal water use varies across locations, and the yield-water use relationship also varies across different regions, which constitutes a challenge for information transfer.

It is therefore important to develop a winter wheat seasonal evapotranspiration-yield production function under local by: 2. Johnson W D and Davis R G Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed wheat: A precision study in the Texas Panhandle.

USDA-ARS ARR-S Jones O R and Popham T W Cropping and tillage systems for dryland grain production in Southern High by: Improving water management in winter wheat. In book: Achieving sustainable cultivation of wheat Volume 2, pp Yield–Water Supply Relationships of Grain Sorghum and Winter Wheat.

Climate–yield relationships for winter wheat were examined across primarily dryland agricultural systems for counties in the Columbia Plateau of the northwestern USA from to Winter wheat daily actual evapotranspiration (ETc) varied from to mm/day, averaging mm/day during the winter wheat growing seasons, and the seasonal evapotranspiration varied from to mm.

Grain yield was dependent on winter wheat variety, decreased with years, and varied from to kg/ by: 2. Water-Yield Relationship Responses of Maize to Ridge-Furrow Planting Systems Coupled with Multiple Irrigation Levels in China’s Horqin Sandy Land.

Previous Article in Journal. Genetic Diversity of Clinal Freezing Tolerance Variation in Winter Wheat Landraces. Previous Article in Special Issue. Olive Water Use, Crop Coefficient, Yield, and Cited by: 2. On average across all soil layers between 20 and cm and two winter wheat varieties, the NRMSE decreased from % with the CERES‐Wheat model to % with the modified model.

Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat: a precision study in the Texas Panhandle / by Wendell C. Johnson and Ronald G. Davis. New Orleans: Agricultural Research, Southern Region, Science and Education Administration, U.S.D.A., SA no The average yields of winter wheat achieved by Irish growers are amongst the highest globally.

This is facilitated by the mild, wet climate and long summer days which results in slow crop development, and a long grain filling period rarely affected by drought.

The crops development through its growth stagesFile Size: 2MB. According to experimental data (October to September ) from the Libao experimental area of Huoquan Irrigation District, China, models for estimating crop water consumption and the relationships between crop yield and water consumption were established.

Taking the continuous cropping of winter wheat and summer maize from October to September Author: Sun JingSheng, Kang ShaoZhong, Zhang JiYang, Hao Jiang, Duang AiWan, Yu XiGen, Xiao JunFu. Yield and winter survival of winter barley varieties as affected by date and rate of planting.

Yield of phosphorous curves. Yield response of spring wheat and barley to nitrogen fertilization in relation to soil and climatic factors. Yield-water relationships of summer-fallowed winter wheat. Archived Publications.

Applied Turfgrass Science (–) Crop Management (–) Forage & Grazinglands (–) Journal of Production Agriculture (–). Wheat, a low water demanding crop, shows a promising alternate option of rice (a high water demanding crop) cultivation during dry, winter period (Ali et al.

For wheat cultivation in Bangladesh, recommended irrigation schedule (time and. Morgan, J.M. Increases in grain yield of wheat by breeding for an osmoregulation gene: relationship to water supply and evaporative demand. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 51(8): Mortimore, M.

Ecosystems and Human Well-being: Current State and Trends. nutrients but also interfere with wheat harvest and the next crop planted after wheat. Even so, it is the winter annuals that have the greatest effect on wheat yields.

It is estimated that winter annual weeds reduce wheat yields by an estimated 10% each year. When wheat prices are low it can be difficult to justify the cost of Size: KB. For more information on each of the different wheat management guides, please click the links below.

To be added to the mailing list for upcoming seminars, please let us know by clicking this link Upcoming Seminar Notification.

Soft-Red Winter Wheat Guide. Written to cover the eastern US and south eastern Canada. NEW Hard-Red Winter Wheat Guide. Mid-Season Recovery from Nitrogen Stress in Winter Wheat Journal of Plant Nutrition Estimation of green bean yield, water deficiency and productivity using spectral indexes during the growing season Irrigation and Drainage Systems Winter Wheat Soybeans Corn Alfalfa Hay Winter Wheat Yield Per Acre (bushels) Average of All Fields Per Acre Value per Bushel Other Crop Income* $ Total Crop Return Fertilizer Crop Insurance Return Over Listed Costs Hired Labor * Includes.

Full text of "Relationships between nitrogen fertilization, soil moisture, and yield of crops" See other formats REUTI0N3IIPS BETWEEM NITROGEN FERTILIZATION, SOIL MOISTURE, AND YIELD OF CROPS by CARLOS ALFREDO PURICELLI B. Sc., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, A MASTER'S REPORT submitted In partial fulfillment of the requirements for.

Economics of Winter Wheat-Summer Fallow vs. Continuous No-Till Spring Wheat in the Horse Heaven Hills, Washington Douglas L. Young, Herbert R. Hinman, and William F. Schillinger1 Introduction This publication presents comparisons of the production costs and profitability of traditional winter wheat-summer fallow grown under conventional tillage.

Twelve winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) genotypes were examined for differences in grain yield, water use efficiency (WUE), and stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in flag leaves. The plants were subjected to rain-fed treatment and supplemental irrigation at the jointing and anthesis stages, during the – and – winter Author: Guirong Huang, Xinying Zhang, Yajing Wang, Fu Feng, Xurong Mei, Xiuli Zhong.

Winter Wheat in $ Summer-Fallow Systems (Low precipitation zone) L.K. Lutcher, D.A. Horneck, D.J. Wysocki, J.M. Hart, S.E. Petrie, and N.W. ChristensenR ecommendations in this fertilizer guide apply to tillage fallow-winter wheat and chemical fallow-winter wheat cropping systems.

This guide is one of a set of. Classification into spring or winter wheat is common and traditionally refers to the season during which the crop is grown. For winter wheat, the physiological stage of heading is delayed until the plant experiences vernalization, a period of 30 to 60. Stone L.

& Schlegel A. Yield-water supply relationship of grain sorghum and winter wheat. Agron. 98, – (). Huang M. B., Shao M. & Zhang L. Water use efficiency and sustainability of different long–term crop rotation systems in the Loess Plateau of China.

Soil Till. Res. 72, 95– ().Cited by: The Pacific Northwest is the largest soft white winter wheat (SWWW) producing area in the United States. Three million acres are planted annually on average, yielding + million bushels.

SWWW generally contains lower levels of protein and gluten, with higher levels of starch than its “hard” class counterparts. Reprinted April Winter Wheat in $ Summer-Fallow Systems (Intermediate precipitation zone) L.K.

Lutcher, D.A. Horneck, D.J. Wysocki, J.M. Hart, S.E. Petrie, and N.W. ChristensenR ecommendations in this fertilizer guide apply to tillage fallow-winter wheat and chemical fallow-winter wheat cropping systems.

This guide is one of a set of. at wheat planting and subsequent wheat yield (Nielsen et al., ). When fallow was replaced with proso mil-let in a wheat–corn–fallow rotation, available soil wa-ter content at wheat planting was decreased by 48% ( cm).

Wheat yield in the wheat–corn–millet system averaged 52% ( kg ha21) less than in the wheat– corn–fallow Cited by:. Objective: The present study was carried out to analyze the differences in grain yield, water use efficiency (WUE) and stem soluble sugar (SS) content under spike in grain filling period in various genotypes of dryland winter wheat.

The correlation between SS and grain yield, WUE under limited irrigation condition were studied. Method: Twelve winter wheat genotypes (from North Author: Fan TingLu, Ma MingSheng, Wang ShuYing, Li ShangZhong, Zhao Gang.Field experiment was conducted during the rabi (winter) seasons of – and –, to evaluate the outcome of irrigation schedules and crop establishment techniques on physiological parameters, root parameters and water productivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum (L.) emend.

Flori & Paol) on sandy loam soils at CCS Haryana Agricultural University Hisar under .Liang He a, James Cleverly b, Chao Chen b, Xiaoya Yang c, Jun Li a, Wenzhao Liu d and ; Qiang Yu * b; a Key Lab. of Water Cycle and Related Land Surface Processes, Institute of Ge.